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Connecting with Parents about Early Warning Systems: Tips and Resources for School Districts

Thursday, August 25, 2016  

1:00 p.m.–2:00 p.m. CT

 

Does your district or state use an early warning system to identify students at risk of dropping out? If so, you may be interested in REL Midwest's webinar series on the topic of connecting with parents about early warning systems. In this two-part webinar series, experts and practitioners from the field share their experiences working with early warning systems and identify strategies to effectively communicate with parents about how data are used in these systems.

 

On Thursday, August 25, 2016, from 2:00 – 3:00 pm (ET) REL Midwest hosted Connecting with Parents about Early Warning Systems: Tips and Resources for School Districts. This webinar featured Lacy Wood, a principal researcher at American Institutes for Research (AIR), who discussed strategies and tools for districts to communicate with parents. Dr. Montrischa Williams, researcher at AIR, covered potential research-based strategies that can be used in outreach to parents about EWS and dropout prevention. Sonica Dhillon, researcher at AIR, shared a brochure for parents that highlights indicators used in EWS and the value of a high school diploma. Participants also had the opportunity to hear from Laurie Kruszynski, a data coordinator at Scott High School (Toledo Public Schools), who shared specific strategies and messages that she has shared with families while implementing an EWS. 

 

Moderator

 

Sarah Rand, Communications Consultant, American Institutes for Research

 

Presenters

 

Sonica Dhillon, Researcher, American Institutes for Research

Laurie Kruszynski, Data Coordinator, Scott High School (Toledo Public Schools)

Montrischa Williams, Ph.D., Researcher, American Institutes for Research

Lacy Wood, Principal Researcher, American Institutes for Research

 

Who Should Attend?

 

Participants may include teachers, school leaders, district leaders and local education agency staff.

 

Related Resources

Bridgeland, L., Dilulio, J., Streeter, R., & Mason, J. (2008). One dream, two realities: Perspectives of parents on America’s high schools. Washington, DC: Civic Enterprises. Retrieved from http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED503358.pdf

 

Data Quality Campaign. (2015). Talking about the facts of education data with parents. Washington, DC: Data Quality Campaign. Retrieved from http://www.dataqualitycampaign.org/wp-content/uploads/files/Data%20Facts%20Parents%20and%20the%20Public.pdf

 

Dynarski, M., Clarke, L., Cobb, B., Finn, J., Rumberger, R., and Smink, J. (2008). Dropout prevention: A practice guide (NCEE 2008–4025). Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Education, Institute of Education Sciences, National Center for Education Evaluation and Regional Assistance. Retrieved from https://ies.ed.gov/ncee/wwc/pdf/practice_guides/dp_pg_090308.pdf

 

Frazelle, S., & Nagel, A. (2015). A practitioner’s guide to implementing early warning systems (REL 2015–056). Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Education, Institute of Education Sciences, National Center for Education Evaluation and Regional Assistance, Regional Educational Laboratory Northwest. Retrieved from http://ies.ed.gov/ncee/edlabs/regions/northwest/pdf/REL_2015056.pdf

 

Greene, J. P. & Winters, M. (2005). Public high school graduation and college readiness rates, 1991–2002. New York: Manhattan Institute for Policy Research.

 

Harvard Family Research Project. (2013) Tips for administrators, teachers, and families: How to share data effectively. Family Involvement Network of Educators (FINE) Newsletter, 5(2). Retrieved from http://www.hfrp.org/var/hfrp/storage/fckeditor/File/7-DataSharingTipSheets-HarvardFamilyResearchProject.pdf

 

Henderson, A., & Mapp, K. (2002). A new wave of evidence: The impact of school, family, and community connections on student achievement. Austin, TX: National Center for Family and Community Connections with Schools. Retrieved from https://www.sedl.org/connections/resources/evidence.pdf

 

Heppen, J., & Therriault, S. (2008). Developing early warning systems to identify potential high school dropouts. Washington, DC: National High School Center.

 

Howard, T. C. (2003). A tug of war for our minds: African American high school students' perceptions of their academic identities and college aspirations. High School Journal, 87, 4-17.

 

National School Public Relations Association. (2011). National survey pinpoints communication preferences in school communication. Rockville, MD: Author. Retrieved from https://www.nspra.org/files/docs/Release%20on%20CAP%20Survey.pdf

 

Privacy Technical Assistance Center. (2014). Transparency best practices for schools and districts. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Education, Privacy Technical Assistance Center.

 

Snyder, T., & Dillow, S. (2011). Digest of education statistics 2010 (2011-015). Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics, Institute of Education Sciences.

 

Therriault, S., Heppen, J., O’Cummings, M., Fryer, A., & Johnson, A. (2010). Early warning system implementation guide. Washington, DC: National High School Center.

 

Toldson, I. A. (2008). Breaking barriers: Plotting the path to academic success for school-age African-American males. Washington, DC: Congressional Black Caucus Foundation.